Rearview Mirror

‘Never love a wild thing, Mr. Bell,’ Holly advised …
‘If you let yourself love a wild thing, you’ll end up looking at the sky.’
– Truman Capote, Breakfast At Tiffany’s

BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S, Audrey Hepburn, 1961

I got married right after being discharged from the army. I don’t know how it happened so fast. Only few days after coming home, I was invited, along with my dad, to my cousins’ in a nearby village. There was a huge feast with multiple bottles of wine and long, broad tables of food. You know how it is when you return to your kin after being gone for a long time. At the table, I sat next to my cousin, lobbing jokes. All of the sudden he shot me a conspiratorial look, indicating with a glance, a girl across the table, the neighbor’s daughter. “Take her, brother,” my cousin said.  “How can I take her?” I said. “C’mon Cuz, I’ve given my heart to another. You know how it is, I can’t.” Couldn’t I? In the whirl of the night, drinks were thrown back. From one moment to the next I don’t remember what happened. I only remember that it was great fun. In the morning I awoke and what did I see? Snuggled up next to me in the bed, the neighbor’s daughter, naked as in the day she was born and gentle and fragile as a dove.  “Christ,” said I to myself. “What have I done?” No secrets exist among relatives. She was still a child—I, her first man.  “You have to take her, son!” the girl’s father said when he heard. “It’s you, or no one. You created this mess, now take the girl!”  So, that’s how it went. In more or less two weeks, we were married and moved in together. I came to love my dear Catherine. She turned out to be a good, sensible girl, and a decent housewife with skillful hands. After a year she gave birth to our son—the proud successor to his dad. Soon after a daughter arrived. We went on to become a good family. The years passed. The children were growing up. Along with them, it was as if Catherine was growing up too. When we first got together, she was still a girl, but now she was beginning to become a woman. And little by little something started to change in her. She did not like how we were living. The small town was choking her, it seemed, and not only that. She started to look beyond Bulgaria. Someone put a bee in her bonnet—the real freedom was in the West. Back in those days, you know, these were dangerous thoughts. Just the idea of escaping abroad could have thrown you into prison. But she kept nagging me to join her in her plans for escape. “Come on, Catherine! Stop fogging your head with these crazy thoughts,” I said. “You don’t want to destroy our family, do you? This is my country. Take it as it is. As for the kids, you’ll get them over my dead body!”  But it was no use. Madmen, like strong winds, can’t be stopped. My Catherine disappeared! On Easter morning she went out early, said she was going to church, and never returned. Okay, she left me…These things happen. But… the kids?! To leave her own children… Was she brave? Was she mad? I ask myself that even today … Well, but one learns to get used to anything. Twenty years have passed without news from Catherine, not a scrap. The children grew up. Don’t ask me how I managed it on my own. How they felt without a mother, I don’t dare inquire. With all the problems of that time, the daily chores, I gradually learned not to think of Catherine. As they say: what you can’t forget, you can at least try not to remember.  One night, I was coming home late from work—crushed and tired as usual. That whole day I just turned the steering wheel here and there.  It was in this same taxi that I’m driving you in now. Well, the phone rang and I was startled! At that time of day, late at night, the only call I would usually have was from my dear old mother, but she’s passed away.  Since then, rarely has anyone been calling me, and I never expected the phone to ring.  “Hello,” I said, after picking up the receiver. On the opposite end was silence—just silence. I felt, however, as if someone was breathing into the phone.  “Hello?” I repeated, half, annoyed, half scared, not knowing why. “Who’s there?” On the other end, again—silence. At this point, something clicked. Strange thoughts spun through my brain. All of the sudden a familiar voice said through sobs and tears:  “The children… How are the children?” My heart clenched. I froze and barely managed to say: “Catherine! Is that you, Catherine? Hello. Hello … Catherine!” Unexpectedly, the connection broke and the phone went dead. Was that really my Catherine? Or was it just my imagination? I couldn’t say! And, well, I didn’t hear anything more from her. The kids are grown now. They went away too, and have their own lives. My son is thirty years old, a builder in Spain, with a family of his own. My daughter is a waitress in England. Thank god she’s left me her kid to care for. My granddaughter’s my only happiness now. It’s for her sake alone that I still drive this taxi. But I put the photos of all of them around the rearview mirror so that when I look back to see if cars are coming, I always see them, my son, my daughter, my grandchildren … Oh, yes, and there is a photo of Catherine, too. Look at her, how she smiles at me. In this picture she’s only twenty-two. It doesn’t matter that the closest people in my life are present only in these pictures. I look at them and they make me happy. Sometimes in real life they are good, sometimes not, but always, so that I don’t worry about them, they smile before me as up here. That is how I see them every day in the rearview mirror, slowly receding into the distance while I continue to drive straight ahead.

BISTRA VELICHKOVA

*The story „Rearview Mirror“ is part of the book Small, Dirty and Sad (Riva Publishers, 2014). Translation to English by Eireene Nealand. The story is published in the Literary American Magazine „Drunken Boat“, 23 ed., 2016


ОГЛЕДАЛО ЗА ОБРАТНО ВИЖДАНЕ

– Никога не се влюбвайте в диво същество, мистър Бел – посъветва го Холи. –
[…] Ако се оставите да обикнете диво същество, накрая ще останете само с поглед към небето.

„Закуска в Тифани”, Труман Капоти

23rd edition of „Drunken Boat“, American Literary Magazine, 2016

​Ожених се малко след като се уволних от казармата. Ама как стана тя – на бърза ръка! Едва няколко дена откак се бях прибрал вкъщи, и отиваме с баща ми на гости на братовчедите в съседното село. Голям гуляй, винó, софри – знаеш как е, кога се прибираш при свои хора, след дълго отсъствие! Та седим си с братовчеда на трапезата, подхвърляме майтапи, току ми се подсмихва той заговорнически и ми сочи с поглед едно девойче през масата. Съседско било, вика: ‘Земи го, брате! „’Бе как ша го взема бе, брат’чед, на друго момиче съм дал сърцето си, не мога!”Не мога ли? Завъртя се вечерта, заобръщаха се чашите, от един момент нататък какво сме правили – не помня, помня само, че веселбата беше голяма. На сутринта се събуждам и що да видя: свило се до мен на леглото съседското девойче, така както я е майка родила – нежно, крехко като гълъбичка! Бре, каква я свърших, викам си! Сред роднини скрито-покрито няма! Тя – девойка, аз – първи мъж, и баща ѝ, като разбра, вика: „Сине, трябва да я ‘земеш! Или ти, или никой! Направил си белята – вземай го момичето!”. И това беше: за има-няма две седмици се оженихме и заживяхме заедно. Заобичах си я аз, моята Катеринка – добро и сговорчиво девойче излезе. А и къщовница, и в ръцете сръчна. След година ми роди син – горд наследник на баща си. Скоро и щерката се появи. Хубаво семейство си наредихме. Минаваха годините, растяха децата, а с тях сякаш и Катеринка порастваше. Кога се взехме, тя беше още дете, а започваше да става жена. И постепенно нещо взе да се променя в нея. Не ѝ харесваше как живеем, започна да я задушава животът в малкия град. Остави това, ами и отвъд България започна да гледа. Пуснал ѝ някой мухата, че на Запад е истинската свобода. А в тия години, знаеш, това бяха страшни приказки. Само мисълта да избягаш в чужбина можеше в затвора да те вкара! А тя и мен навива на нейния акъл! Викам: „Катерино, стига си си помътвала главата с щуротии! Семейството ни ша затриеш! Това е моята родина – каквато-такава! Не мърдам оттук, а децата ще вземеш само през трупа ми!”. Но не би! Луд човек и силен вятър нищо ги не спира! Изчезна моята Катерина! Една сутрин по Възкресение излезе рано, уж за черква, и повече не се върна. Мен изостави – хайде, това как да е, но децата…! Да си остави децата! Смела ли беше, луда ли беше, и до днес все това се питам… Е, ‘секо нещо се учи, със ‘секо нещо се свиква! Двайсе’ години се изтъркóлиха, а от Катеринка – ни вест, ни кост. Децата израснаха, как съм ги гледал сам – не ме питай! Какво им е било на тях без майка – това аз не смея да ги питам! Покрай ежедневните грижи и тревоги за всичките тези години постепенно се научих да не мисля за Катерина. Знаеш, нещата, които не можеш да забравиш, можеш поне да се научиш да не си спомняш. Дори и тогава обаче не можеш да спреш миналото да напомня за себе си! Прибирам се една вечер късно от работа – смачкан, изморен, пак цял ден бях въртял волана на същото това такси, в което те возя и теб сега. Звъни телефонът и аз се стреснах! По това време се обаждаше само старата ми майка, преди да се спомине. Оттогава рядко някой ме търсеше и аз никого не очаквах. Казвам „Ало“, а отсреща – тишина. Усещам обаче, че сякаш някой диша в слушалката. „Ало? Кой се обажда?”, повторих, наполовина раздразнен, наполовина уплашен, без сам да разбирам защо. Отсреща – пак тишина. Нещо в този момент трепна в мен. Странни мисли започнаха да се въртят в главата ми. Внезапно познат глас каза през хлипове плач: „Децата… Как са децата…?” Сърцето ми се сви. Вцепених се. Едва промълвих: „Катерина! Ти ли си, Катерина? Ало, ало… Катерина!” Неочаквано връзката се разпадна и телефонът замръзна мъртъв пред мен. Наистина ли беше тя – моята Катеринка? На мене ли ми се строи така? Не мога да ти кажа! Така и повече нищо не чух от нея… Днес децата са съвсем големи. Разбягаха се и те. Синът е на 30, със семейство – строител в Испания. Дъщерята пък е в Англия – сервитьорка. Добре че поне внучката на мен остави да я гледам, та тя е единствената ми радост сега. Само за нея още въртя този волан по цял ден. Ето ги тука всички къде са! Сложил съм си ги над огледалото, та кога гледам назад дали идват коли, все тях да виждам. И сина, и дъщерята, та и внуците до тях! Ей я нá и Катеринка, гледай само как ми се усмихва. Тук е едва на 22. И нищо, че са ми само на снимка! Гледам си ги аз и им се радвам. Понякога са добре, понякога не, ама все гледат да се усмихнат за пред мен – да не се тревожа аз. Така ги гледам все в огледалото за обратно виждане как бавно се отдалечават, докато аз продължавам да карам напред.

БИСТРА ВЕЛИЧКОВА

*Разказът „Огледало за обратно виждане“ е от сборника разкази “Малка, мръсна и тъжна” (ИК Рива, 2014). Разказът е преведен на английски език от Айрийн Нийланд. Публикуван е в американското литературно списание „Drunken Boat“, бр. 23, 2016 г.

Advertisements

Вашият коментар

Попълнете полетата по-долу или кликнете върху икона, за да влезете:

WordPress.com лого

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Промяна )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Промяна )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Промяна )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Промяна )

Connecting to %s